Camel trains are holding up Ethiopia’s new railway line

February 10, 2018
               News

Compensating the owners of camels killed by trains with twice their market value creates perverse incentives

Since the start of commercial operations last month, at least 50 animals have been killed crossing the new Chinese-built line connecting Addis Ababa with the port of Djibouti.

ADAMA, Ethiopia (The Economist)―“More than any other technical design or social institution,” wrote the late British historian, Tony Judt, “the railway stands for modernity.” But the road to modernity can be a bumpy one. So it was at the opening of the world’s first steam passenger railway in 1830, when a dignitary in Liverpool was crushed by a train. So too in Saudi Arabia today, where construction of a high-speed railway was almost derailed by advancing sand dunes. And also in Ethiopia, where Africa’s newest major railroad has been frustrated by one of civilization’s earliest forms of transport, the camel.

Since the start of commercial operations last month, at least 50 animals have been killed crossing the new Chinese-built line connecting Addis Ababa, the capital of landlocked Ethiopia, with the port of neighboring Djibouti. Of these, 15 were camels flattened in a single collision, according to Tilahun Farka, the head of the jointly state-owned Ethio-Djibouti Railways, which manages the locomotives.

Camel herders in the arid scrubland east of Addis Ababa report many more such incidents over the previous year of trial operations. Nado, a 21-year-old nomad on the outskirts of Adama, says his family lost 35 camels in an especially bloody collision. “Some of my brothers lost all the camels they have,” he complains. And it is not just camels. Donkeys, cows, sheep and goats have also been hit, though it is the ungainly camels that are most at risk. “The train never stops,” says Nado. “It just hits and passes on.”

For the Ethiopian government this is a headache. The train, which is supposed to slash transportation times to the coast from two days to ten hours, is operating at around half speed.

Continue reading this story at The Economist

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